I answered this question on the website Quora a few weeks ago. Here’s my Top 10 (in no real order of importance) list why you should probably quit your current position and move on:

  1. You start looking forward to the weekend on Wednesday (or even worse, Monday).
    This is the typical, “I can’t stand my job and I love my weekends behavior”. Face it, you are going to spend a LOT more time at work during the week — start enjoying that environment too. If you don’t like what you do, your boss, the people, the commute, etc. — change it.
  2. Sunday night is the loneliest time of the week because you have work the next day.
    If you hate going to work where it begins to affect your weekends, it’s time to start looking for greener pastures.
  3. You find yourself mired in mundane tasks at work – you’re not working on exciting and challenging projects.
    It happens to the best of us — sometimes we need a career ‘reset’ button to help us re-focus on what’s really important and where we want to take our career.
  4. Everything is becoming SOS – same old stuff – day in, day out repetition.
    If you’re just wrapping the same old chocolates every day — it’s time to go.
  5. You never ask for guidance or advice anymore from your boss. You’ve grown out of your role.
    This is a telling sign — you’ve outgrown your manager. They don’t have anything else to teach you — and to be successful, you have to keep learning.
  6. Everyone around you is as unmotivated and depressed as you are.
    Oh-Oh — either management is not doing their job or the company is ailing. Time to look for healthier stock.
  7. Your superiors begin to take long lunches and start to leave the company. They know something you don’t know.
    That’s a clear sign you’re about to be acquired, broken into small chunks, or obliterated into the atmosphere. Start planning your exit strategy.
  8. Sales are down, the company hasn’t rolled out anything new in the marketplace for a long time, and your competitors are hitting new heights.
    Things might turn around, but then, they might not. It’s up to you if you have the time, temerity and patience to wait.
  9. You can’t get anything accomplished, projects are never approved (or cancelled mid-term), or your division is distracted by crazy hail-mary launches that never work.
    That is one of the most frustrating parts of corporate work — the lost years — the lost projects — and eventually, the lost people. If you find you’re giving 150% to all of your work and for some reason, they’re cancelled, postponed, or put on the shelf, it’s time to step back and assess. Not only does it suck, but it cuts right to the bone of any performing professional to see your blood, sweat and tears wiped away in a matter of minutes. Time to go.
  10. Things don’t feel right – your salary has been stagnant for years, bonuses are anemic, and you find yourself surfing a lot on the web.
    Any one of these three are a clear indicator of a bad work situation. If you get more than one, start polishing your résumé.

Extra-Credit: Upper management employs a ‘consultancy firm’ to help them turn the ship in the right direction – always a clear signal something’s wrong.

Most consultancy firms are brought in when management is either disconnected from the business or they are unable to develop a new business solution on their own. In my opinion, these consultancies are usually a band-aid for a more severe problem — they’re brought in to calm the fears of investors and show Wall Street that the company is on-track to hit their fake targets.

In any event, there will be changes. Either The Bob’s (watch this or this scene from Office Space) will come in and assess everyone’s responsibilities and/or they will make broad spectrum changes that will probably impact your progress. Time to review your options and think about leaving.