Recession

/Tag:Recession

3 Ways To Update Your Career GPS.

It's about time. The recession is over, things are looking up, companies are hiring, executives are coming out from hiding in their offices and cubicles. For all intents and purposes, many of us have held our collective breaths for the past 2 years for this moment. It's now time to take stock of who we currently are, where we are in our career, and where we want to go.

The Most Important (financial) Book You’ll Buy This Year.

I read LOTS of books. And it's funny - a lot of people are amazed at the number of books I read. I don't think I read a lot - but many people I meet think I'm crazy about spending time reading books. Candidly, I feel that it's a clear sign of the 'dumbing down' of America. People are 'shamed' into not reading - you should see the faces of people when I mention I read 3-5 books at a time and finish 100-150 books a year. "Don't you have better things to do with your time?"

What’s Killing Your Career? The Laws of Nature.

Newton's First Law of Motion: An object at rest tends to stay at rest unless acted upon by a sum of physical forces. This is the typical employee at work today. As long as they have a job, they won't take any risks, butt any heads, or raise their hand at a meeting. In essence, they are an "object at rest". And this employee/object will remain at rest (meaning - no movement - no raises, no promotions, no new projects, no GROWTH) until "a sum of physical forces" are acted upon it.

Wall Street’s Gambling Soul.

Of all the insulting labels lobbed at Wall Street over the past two years, you wouldn't expect "overconfident" to be the one that hurt. But it has. This week's New Yorker article by Malcolm Gladwell on Wall Street's "psychology of overconfidence" struck a nerve.

The New Joblessness.

The U.S. economy is not only shedding jobs at a record rate; it is shedding more jobs than it is supposed to. It’s bad enough that the unemployment rate has doubled in only a year and a half and one out of six construction workers is out of work.

CEO’s Must Trash Short-Term Thinking & Embrace Long-Term Strategy. Now.

I'm tired. And angry. And I'm not alone. For too long, the stewards of our most cherished institutions have been acting less than ethical. I call it "short term thinking for short term gain" — get in, make a quick buck, and move on to the next sucker. Not the best behavior for supposedly the best executives in this nation.

The Future of Work: Yes, We’ll Still Make Stuff.

Presenting Part Nine of a Ten-Part Series on The Future of Work from Time Magazine.

By David Von Drehle at Time.

The death of American manufacturing has been greatly exaggerated. According to U.N. statistics, the U.S. remains by far the world’s largest manufacturer, producing nearly twice as much value as No. 2 China. Since 1990, U.S. manufacturing output has grown by nearly $800 billion — an amount larger than the entire manufacturing economy of Germany, a global powerhouse.

But growth does not mean jobs. While sales soared (at least until the recession), manufacturing employment sank. Using constantly improving technology to make more-valuable goods, American workers doubled their productivity in less than a generation — which, paradoxically, rendered millions of them obsolete. (See pictures of retailers which have gone out of business.)

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Losing Your Job & Breaking Shovels.

It's a lot like losing your job. The first time it happens, people are pretty shell-shocked. They do a lot of soul searching (why me?), denial, hatred of their company, boss, etc. — you know the drill. Ultimately, when the adrenaline dissipates, they get down to business and look for a new job. The second time someone loses a job (and this happens more often that you realize in this economy), they tend to almost laugh about it, pick themselves up quickly, and go after that next job.

Want to keep your job? Be happy.

Does the recession with its rampant layoffs and cutbacks make your job look better all the time? Believe it or not, donning a pair of "recession goggles" can be good for your career and your mental health. Research shows that an attitude of gratitude in trying times can not only help you keep your job, but get you the job you want.

Do You Trust This Man?

Time to get on my soapbox for a minute.

Paul Volker, covered in the NY Times, said, “Even the experts don’t quite know what’s going on.” That’s a very scary statement.

The house of cards has fallen people. Oz has been discovered behind the curtain. Unfortunately, we are also the enemy. Let me explain.

I’ve worked in corporate for […]